From Tamil Morning – Website introduced to capture federal election related issues discussed in the ethnic media – Tamil

A website has been introduced so that Canadians could come to know about the important issues discussed in the ethnic media, related to the federal election happening in October 2019. The website, known as diversityvotes.ca, will carry stories related to the Canadian federal election, appearing in about 800 ethnic media sources across Canada. The website also contains statistics about diverse ethnic groups and immigrants. The founders of the website say that the mission of this website is to provide equal opportunity to all candidates by creating transparency about the exclusive campaigns/propaganda targeted towards minority communities by candidates and political parties.

Source: RADIO – CMR FM 101.3 Tamil Morning (200000 – Daily5) – Toronto, 18/06/2019 – News, 1/2 min, 4/4, Tamil

From The Canadian Parvasi – New tool launched to shine light on ethnic media coverage of election issues – South Asian English

A new tool will help voters learn what federal issues are resonating in ethnic media and the potential effect on voting in this fall’s election. Andrew Griffith, a former director general with the Immigration Department, has partnered with Mirems — a firm that monitors and translates stories from over 800 ethnic media outlets. Together, they created a website called Diversityvotes.ca, that ties comprehensive statistics about Canada’s minority communities with ethnic media stories. Griffith says the data will provide riding-by-riding context about who is consuming multi-lingual news stories and quantify how their opinions could influence individual races. Andres Machalski, president of Mirems, says he hopes the initiative will allow new and native-born Canadians to have a better understand the political issues being discussed and how they resonate among different ethnic groups.

Source: WEB – The Canadian Parvasi (Daily7) – Mississauga, 18/06/2019 – NEWS, 1 page web, 5th.

From The Canadian Global Affairs Institute – Check Out This New Election Resource From CGAI Fellow Andrew Griffith

Diversity Votes: Matching ridings with ethnic media to increase civic knowledge and participation

CGAI Fellow Andrew Griffith has been working with MIREMS (Multilingual International Research in Ethnic Media Services) to match riding level demographic and socio-economic data with insights from ethnic media.

 

Their objectives are:

  • More in-depth understanding of riding characteristics, and how these interact with electoral strategies;
  • Wider awareness of how national and local issues are portrayed in community and regional ethnic media to increase accountability of ethnic-oriented media strategies;
  • Allow for more informed discussion regarding ethnic voting patterns and issues; and,
  • Greater responsibility of candidates and political parties of their messaging to different groups.

diversityvotes.ca launched this week, a fully interactive website that combines this riding level data with stories and commentaries from ethnic media to fill the gaps in understanding between Canada’s diverse communities, the media they listen to, read and watch, and how that can affect how they cast their ballot in the upcoming federal election.

The website is focussing on ridings with the largest number of visible minorities: 41 where visible minorities are the majority, 93 where they form more than 20 percent, with significant pockets of five to 20 percent in another 95 ridings.

We invite you to check out diversityvotes.ca. Look up your riding and explore the data. Check the ethnic media headlines and articles. Read the blogs, articles and background.

The Canadian Press: New tool launched to shine light on ethnic media coverage of election issues

Andrew Griffith, left to right, Mirems Editor-In-Chief Silke Reichrath and President Andrew Machalski pose for a photo in Ottawa on Monday June 17, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

OTTAWA — A new tool launched Tuesday could help voters learn what political issues are resonating in ethnic media and how that could impact voting in the fall federal election.

Andrew Griffith, a former director general with the Immigration Department, has partnered with MIREMS, a firm that monitors and translates stories from over 800 ethnic media outlets, to create Diversityvotes.ca.

The website takes comprehensive statistics about Canada’s minority communities and presents it alongside stories by ethnic media outlets. Griffith said the data will provide context about who is consuming multilingual news stories in any riding and quantify how their opinions could influence individual races.

“One of the key objectives is really to break the communities out of their silos and break the politicians out of their silo approach by basically level the playing field,” Griffith said.

“(This will) provide greater transparency about what is happening within one community versus a different community, what is the diversity within the community, and those kinds of issues to help empower the process and ensure there is greater participation and greater awareness.”

The online tool is also expected to shine a light on how campaigns are interacting with different ethnic communities. It could, for example, provide greater transparency over politicians or parties that target their messages differently to individual minority groups in the hopes of winning votes in the October election.

This kind of targeting became an issue in the lead-up to the byelection in Burnaby South earlier this year after the Liberal candidate in the riding, Karen Wang, posted on Chinese social media platform WeChat that she was the “only” Chinese candidate while NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh — her opponent — was “of Indian descent.”

Wang resigned as the candidate and issued an apology denying any racist intent.

Andres Machalski, president of MIREMS, said he hopes the new initiative will not only expose possible political gaffes like the one in Burnaby South, but more widely give new and native-born Canadians a better idea of what is being discussed among different ethnic groups.

“It’s an awareness of diversity,” he said.

“What has happened to diversity in Canada and the world is that it’s shifted from being motherhood and apple pie to being something that is polarized. It’s being weaponized and used to discriminate and at the same time it is the heart of our country — this is a country made up of immigrants.”

There are 41 ridings where visible minorities form the majority of the voting population and another 93 ridings where minorities make up between 20 and 50 per cent of eligible voters, Griffith said. Issues that matter to them and the way they react to policy announcements in the campaign will make a difference in those ridings or in areas with close races, he said.

“You’re not going to win a majority government unless you have strong support in immigrant-rich or visible-minority-rich ridings. It’s just physically impossible.”

The tool is free to use, but Machalski said users can donate on the website to the public service project.

The rise of the Green Party and environmental concerns in the ethnic media

As a riding that is about 80% Caucasian and 10% Aboriginal with no major concentration of any other ethnic group, Nanaimo-Ladysmith does not typically capture the imagination of the ethnic media in Canada. Its recent by-election got barely a handful of mentions in the run-up to the event. However, the surprise win of Green Party Candidate Paul Manly was widely covered, followed by reports that the Green Party is trying to recruit MPs Jody Wilson-Raybould and Jane Philpott.

A lot of coverage was concentrated in the Chinese and South Asian media, which with their daily news reporting on radio, TV and print often mirror mainstream reporting and then add their own perspective in commentaries and talk show discussions, and in the Italian and Spanish media, possibly reflecting a heightened European and Latino preoccupation with environmental matters. All the coverage was neutral or positive towards the Green Party.

Much of the reporting concentrated on revealing the by-election results reflected that it shows that environmental issues are becoming more prominent in Canada and will be at play in the upcoming federal election. However, Punjabi media in particular were concerned with the implications for the NDP under Jagmeet Singh. A caller on the Punjabi program on Red FM in Vancouver speculated that the NDP and the Liberals lost because they ran First Nations candidates in a riding that was predominantly white. The Punjabi radio program on WTOR 770 AM in Toronto reported that Indian news channels in India consider the by-election a big loss for Jagmeet Singh. However, WTOR pointed out that it was a big loss for the Conservatives, Liberals and NDP.

Wu Chu He wrote a commentary in the Chinese paper 51.ca indicating that Canadians are feeling betrayed and angry at Prime Minister Trudeau and have the impression that he does not deliver. The NDP’s performance has also been disappointing, so that non-Conservative voters have no choice but to vote for the Green Party. One comment on this piece argued that people are fooled by the mainstream media, who don’t like the Conservative Party because “the bosses of mainstream media are all rich people.”

The daily national Italian news on OMNI TV ran a feature connecting the by-election in Nanaimo-Ladysmith and the provincial election in Prince Edward Island, where the Green Party formed the Official Opposition for the first time ever, to national election polls, the struggle between the federal government and several provinces over the carbon tax, and a recent United Nations report on biodiversity. The United Nations found that a million species are threatened with extinction. A York University professor said humans will not survive as a species if they continue to have such a negative impact on the earth. Young people interviewed on the program expressed concern for the environment and called for more action.

With the national struggle over the carbon tax, environmental matters are increasingly becoming a concern in the ethnic media. To some extent, they reflect mainstream media and provincial priorities – support for the oil industry in Alberta vs. support for environmental protection in BC –, but they are also informed by the prominence environmental concerns have in countries of origin and by the views of individual opinion leaders on talk shows and in editorials and by discussion with callers from the audience and online comments.

Metropolis Conference: Doing Immigration Differently

As a riding that is about 80% Caucasian and 10% Aboriginal with no major concentration of any other ethnic group, Nanaimo-Ladysmith does not typically capture the imagination of the ethnic media in Canada. Its recent by-election got barely a handful of mentions in the run-up to the event. However, the surprise win of Green Party Candidate Paul Manly was widely covered, followed by reports that the Green Party is trying to recruit MPs Jody Wilson-Raybould and Jane Philpott.

Amid sessions on immigration strategies, immigration and hockey, municipal government’s fight for more control at the 2019 Metropolis Immigration conference in Halifax, was an underlying intent to do things differently—and do them right. However, the complicated cobwebs of immigration and multiculturalism in Canada were also exposed. It’s a mammoth task that has landed on the desks of community organizers, municipal staff, newcomers, language teachers and more.

A regular struggle voiced at the conference was a need for real, effective settlement strategies, alongside cries of difficulty in shifting perspectives and mechanisms for measurement.

Madeline Ziniak, Chair of Canadian Ethnic Media Association and multicultural media expert spoke to the plenary audience about ethnic media. In front of an audience of immigration and settlement experts, she spoke to the struggle being voiced looking for mechanisms of measurement and meaningful integration communications.

Ziniak says ethnic media informs the cohesive bond of ethnocultural multilingual contributors to the feeling of belonging, acts as a lens for the interpretation of cultural values and is a barometer of portrayal for mainstream policy and ideas in multicultural communities. Noting the importance of comfort that comes from a mother tongue.

The expressions and reflections of Canada’s diversity are part of the settlement and integration process. For seniors, who generally tend to revert to their mother tongue as they age, ethnic media helps them to remain connected. Voices silenced in immigrant countries of origin can find a voice in Canadian ethnic media and thus perhaps influencing events in those countries.

Following Ziniak’s words at Metropolis, Andrew Griffith and MIREMS presented diversityvotes.ca, a project that works to connect with many of the questions and challenges raised over the course of the conference. The project hopes to answer these questions: What role do ethnic media play in connecting census data and the state of public opinion to community integration? and how does this data affect ethnic media makers and consumers?

By creating a tool where census-level data about Canada’s diverse communities exists alongside the media being published by those communities, diversityvotes.ca gives unprecedented access to these diverse voices and makes the case for including them in the mainstream discourse.

A main point of discussion after the presentation was the complexity of newcomer communities. The importance of remembering that newcomers is not a blanket term for Canada’s “others.” In 41 federal ridings, “minorities” are the majority. diversityvotes.ca highlights this fact, inviting users into these communities to understand the complexities and differences within Canada’s diverse citizens.

The need for effective and innovative settlement strategies, on municipal, provincial and federal scales, showed us demand for this kind of on-the-ground connection to the communities being served.

Trying to share a message, gauge response to initiatives it’s important to take all the available information into account—even information traditionally trapped behind language barriers and complicated data sheets.

At Metropolis, we saw great enthusiasm from hard-working Canadians who care about doing immigration differently. We also saw how things get stalled, switched and shifted. Immigration policy has real-life, on-the-ground effects on newcomers and their communities, and you can be sure they are talking about these effects in their local, mother tongue multilingual and multicultural media.

Analysis: By-election ethnic media reporting and diversity demographics

Andrew Griffith and MIREMS looked at over 300 news, opinion, editorial and commentary stories from Canada’s ethnic media during Canada’s February by-election campaigns. These stories provided media coverage that would have otherwise been trapped behind language barriers and bring unique stories and perspectives from Canada’s diverse communities.

The highest volumes of stories came from Indo-Canadian media (predominantly Punjabi but also South Asian English, Hindi and Urdu) and Chinese Canadian media (Chinese, Mandarin, Cantonese).

Ridings and communities with larger visible minority groups have a larger and more active multicultural and multilingual media. Their audiences are more engaged, and their coverage is more extensive, their writers and reporters often live and work in these communities. It’s local news with an often more-dedicated audience than traditional local news.

Diversity Votes — February By-elections: Matching Census Data with Ethnic Media Coverage (17-23 February 2019, last pre-election report)

Ethnic Media Coverage

All articles focused on Burnaby South. Overall, coverage remained stable at 25 articles The chart below shows the by-election coverage by language from the start of the year.

During the past week, Chinese (44 percent) and Punjabi (28 percent) media continued to comprise the majority of ethnic media coverage of the by-elections, with more articles in Korean media (16 percent) than in previous weeks.

Most stories focused on NDP leader Singh’s campaign (7 articles, many focusing on his call for a public enquiry regarding the pressure placed on former Justice minister Wilson-Raybould regarding the SNC Lavalin case), PM Trudeau’s visit (6 articles) with Peoples Party of Canada leader Bernier’s visit also covered (2 articles in Mandarin media only).

Diversity Votes — February By-elections: Matching Census Data with Ethnic Media Coverage (9-16 February 2019)

Ethnic Media Coverage

The ongoing focus on Burnaby South continued, in particular given the visit of PM Trudeau to the riding to support Liberal candidate Richard Lee. Overall, coverage remained stable at 26 articles, compared to 25 articles the previous week.

While Punjabi ((30.8 percent) and Chinese (38.5 percent) comprised the majority of ethnic media coverage of the by-elections, this was less than previous weeks. New to ethnic media coverage were two stories covered in Caribbean (English) media.

The Prime Minister’s visit featured was covered by all ethnic media covered during this period and was the focus of virtually all the articles in Chinese media. There was some mention of the ongoing scandal regarding possible interference in the judicial process involving SNC Lavalin and former justice minister Wilson-Raybould. Calls by Conservative leader Andrew Scheer and NDP Jagmeet Singh for the PM to waive solicitor-client privilege were reported in Punjabi and Caribbean media.

Diversity Votes — February By-elections: Matching Census Data with Ethnic Media Coverage (31 January to 8 February 2019)

Ethnic Media Coverage

The ongoing focus on Burnaby South continued, with more articles commenting on the risks to Jagmeet Singh’s leadership of the NDP should he not win the by-election in both Punjabi and Chinese (Chinese, Cantonese and Mandarin) media. Overall, coverage increased slightly to 25 articles compared to 18 the previous week (earlier weeks had 41 and 97 articles).

Media coverage was roughly evenly split between Punjabi (44 percent) and 40 percent in Chinese media.

In addition to the risks to Jagmeet Singh’s leadership, NDP fund-raising difficulties were covered as well as the Party’s poor prospects in Outremont based on polling data in Punjabi media. Singh’s universal pharmacare plan received coverage but was largely drowned out by stories concerning the risks to his leadership.